by tracybanaszynski

H received Hib, HepA, and varicella vaccinations at his 18 month well child check up.

Hib, or Haemophilus influenza type b, is a bacterium that causes meningitis when it infects the lining of the brain. Other diseases caused by Hib include sepsis, epiglottitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. The potential side effects of Hib vaccine are pain or soreness at the injection site and low-grade fever. Side effects, if they occur, appear within 48 hours of receiving the vaccine.

HepA, or Hepatitis A, is a virus that causes hepatitis (inflammation of the liver). Symptoms include fever, jaundice, nausea, and vomiting. Young children are often asymptomatic. The potential side effects of HepA vaccine are pain, redness, and tenderness at the injection site; and headache. Side effects, if they occur, appear within 48 hours of receiving the vaccine.

Varicella, or chicken pox, is a relatively benign infection that starts as red bumps that turn into blisters that cover the entire body. Varicella infections can have severe complications, including pneumonia and encephalitis. One out of every 50 women infected with varicella during pregnancy will deliver a child with birth defects that may include mental retardation and shortened or atrophied limbs. In addition, varicella blisters provide a pathway for the flesh-eating bacteria Group A streptococcus to enter the skin and cause severe or fatal disease. The potential side effects of varicella vaccine are pain and tenderness at the injection site, low-grade fever, and rash around the injection site (4 of 100 recipients) or rash more distant to the site of injection (less frequently). Side effects, if they occur, appear between 7 to 10 days of receiving the vaccine.

H received these vaccinations two weeks ago. Nothing striking happened, with the exception of some swelling at the injection sites and the acquisition of immunity from three diseases.

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