Parenting H

Category: story time

The theme at story time today was space. There were, as you might suppose, stories and songs about outer space.

Here are the songs we sang before H decided he was all done with story time.

I’m a Little Rocket
(To the tune of I’m a Little Teapot)

I’m a little rocket, tall and thin
[Stand with arms stretched overhead]
Here is my nose cone
[Fingertips meet overhead to form cone]
Here is my fin
[Hold arms from sides pointing down like fins]
When I get all fired up
Launch begins
Watch me rise
[Jump up]
And see me spin!
[Spin in place]

We’re Flying Off to Space
(To the tune of The Farmer in the Dell)

We’re flying off to space
We’re flying off to space
I think we’ll see the moon up there!
We’re flying off to space

I think we’ll see some planets there!
I think we’ll see some stars up there!
I think we’ll see a rocket there!

Climb Aboard the Spaceship
(To the tune of The Itsy Bitsy Spider)

Climb aboard the spaceship
We’re going to the moon
Hurry up and get ready
We’re going to blast off soon!
Put on your helmet
And buckle up real tight
Here comes the countdown
Let’s count with all our might!

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
Blast off!

The letter at story time today was T (t).

We heard stories involving tricks and tricksters (April Fool’s Day is next Tuesday!), including Counting Crocodiles by Judy Sierra.

We sang The Lollipop Tree:
One fine day in early spring I played a funny trick
Right in the yard behind my house I planted a lollipop stick
Then every day I watered it well and watched it carefully
I hoped one day that stick would grow to be a lollipop tree

Chorus
Ah ha ha, Oh ho ho, what a place to be
Under my lollipop, lollipop, lollipop, lolly lolly lollipop tree!

Then one day I woke to find a very lovely sight
A tree all full of lollipops had grown in the dark of the night
I sat beneath that wonderful tree and looked up with a grin
And when I opened up my mouth a pop would drop right in

Chorus

Winter came and days grew cold as winter days will do
On my tree my lovely tree not one little lollipop grew
From every branch an icicle hung, the twigs were bare as bones
But when I broke the icicles off they turned to ice cream cones

Chorus

The early literacy tip was about writing:
“What’s this? Looking at representations of things, whether they’re pictures, sculpture, or anything at all helps kids understand the idea of labeling. This is important later on as they begin to understand that letters represent sound and the written word represents meaning.”

The letter at story time today was O (o).

We heard ocean-themed stories, including I’m the Best Artist in the Ocean by Kevin Sherry and Wow! Ocean! by Robert Neubecker.

We sang Fish Are Swimming in the Water:
All the fish are swimming in the water
Swimming in the water, swimming in the water
All the fish are swimming in the water
Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble, SPLASH!

The little tiny fish is swimming in the water…
The great big fish is swimming in the water…

We used our tiny and big voices to sing the second and third verses, respectively.

The early literacy tip was about playing:
“Let’s explore! Most kids don’t scuba dive, but they can in their imaginations. Imaginative play gives kids permission to explore places and concepts that they have trouble understanding on their own. And if you imagine with them, you lend your own knowledge to their understanding.”

The letter at storytime today was V (v) for Valentine’s Day.

We heard stories about hugs and kisses, including How Do You Hug a Porcupine by Laurie Isop.

We sang (and signed) Love Grows by Carol Johnson:
Love grows one by one, two by two
And four by four
Love grows round like a circle
And comes back knocking at your front door

The early literacy tip was about writing:
“Studies have shown that learning reading and writing go hand in hand. Whether your child is drawing hearts or writing words, putting a pencil, marker, or crayon in their hands is preparing them for writing. They are learning to express themselves on paper, as well as developing dexterity and hand strength.”

The letter at storytime today was F (f).

We heard stories about feelings, including Augustus and His Smile by Catherine Rayner.

We sang The Feeling Little Spider (to the tune of The Itsy Bitsy Spider):
The happy little spider went up the water spout
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
And the happy little spider went up the spout again

The sad little spider…
The angry little spider…
The scared little spider…
The excited little spider…

Each verse was sung in such a way as to convey the feeling of the spider.

The early literacy tip was about talking:
“How do you feel? Studies have shown that reading fiction boosts empathy. Stories help kids put themselves in the shoes of someone else and understand how they might be feeling. So talk about those feelings to help kids understand their own feelings as well as the feelings of others!”

The letter at storytime today was H (h).

We heard stories about helping, including Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore.

We sang Helping Hands:

When I see someone fall down
I will lift them up.
If they’re lying on the ground
I’ll use my helping hands.

Chorus:

Helping hands helping one another.
I’ll do all I can with my helping hands.
If my Mommy is the cook
And the baby’s crying,
I will read to him a book
And use my helping hands.

[Repeat chorus]

If my Daddy is alone
Working in the garden,
I will help him weed and hoe
With my helping hands.

[Repeat chorus]

Hands should never hurt or fight
Or make someone unhappy.
Do some good and make things right
With your helping hands.
Helping hands helping one another.
Let’s do all we can with our helping hands.

[Repeat]

Oh, let’s do all we can with our helping hands.
Oh, let’s do all we can with our helping hands!

The early literacy tip was about singing:

“Whistle while you work! It’s not just Mary Poppins who can make work fun by singing a song. Getting help doing something can be as simple as making it into a song. It doesn’t have to be anything official…just pick a familiar tune, and put your own words to it! Not only are you making it more fun, but you’re helping your kids hear the beats and phrasing inherent to language…important building blocks to reading!”